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Racial justice is a feminist issue.

December 8, 2014

Racial justice is a feminist issue.

  • Racial justice a feminist issue because cis women of color, trans women of color, and gender queer people of color die at the hands of police.
  • Racial justice is a feminist issue because women of color–and especially queer and trans women of color–must be centered in our community organizing conversations in order to challenge structural state-perpetuated violence and racism.
  • Racial justice a feminist issue because systemic violence is a feminist issue.
  • Racial justice is a feminist issue.
Many of our community members are actively participating in speaking out, protesting, taking action, and standing in solidarity, in response to the rash of policy brutality that continues to sweep the United States.  As a feminist community center, we are hosting workshops on how to stay safe and healthy while taking this struggle to the streets.  Taught and facilitated by Rose Hip Collective, please join us at In Other Words for at least one of these street safety workshops:
ProtestSafetyTraining
Come join us for one of these two-hour trainings about keeping you and yours safe while protesting for a better world. We’ll cover identifying police tactics, action preparation, and talk about those strange and illustrious medics you see roaming about with red crosses. These are the first of what we hope will be several such workshops in coming weeks.  Can’t make either of the safety trainings?  Please click here to download a protest safety pocket guide.
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Critical upcoming actions:

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There are innumerable ways to make your voice heard. The most important part is to engage, speak out, and be true to yourself and your communities.  Here are a few of the many ongoing ways to speak out:

  • Don’t Shoot PDX is a primary organizer of many of the significant actions that have taken place in Portland so far in response to recent police brutality: the march in protest of no indictment for Michael Brown’s murder in Ferguson Missouri, the march in protest of no indictment for Eric Garner’s murder in Staten Island New York, the action at the Moda Center, and multiple follow-up marches, actions, and protests at the Justice Center, Courthouse, Pioneer Place Mall, and the Apple Store.
  • Mourning Glory Publishing:  call for submissions
  • Healing Justice for Black Lives Matter
Volunteers Stay safe out there, feminists.
You are valued, appreciated, and worth it.
 In Other Words loves you.
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Got a suggestion or a new event to add to the lists above?   Please let us know so we can keep this blog post current and updated! Please drop us a line at communications[at]inotherwords[dot]org with the information and a URL link.
In Other Words Feminist Community Center is an entirely volunteer-run 501(c)3 non-profit.

PFLAG Portland Black Chapter screens “Out In The Night”

December 8, 2014
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The last screening and discussion hosted by PFLAG Portland Black Chapter featuring the film ‘Dear White People’ was beyond sold out!   Thank you to all who supported and who were able to attend! We hope you enjoyed the event.

PFLAG Portland Black Chapter happily extends an invitation to you to attend their next screening and panel discussion for “Out In The Night” on December 18th.  We encourage you to get tickets ASAP while they last!

Read more…

On (finally) finding a feminist community

December 8, 2014
I had a wonderful time at In Other Words for the Holiday Open House. This year was festive and free and it was wonderful to see both old and new faces in the space. While there, I found a pile of rolled up posters on the sale table that sparked my curiosity. As I dug through the pile, there was a mix and match of historical posters, book publication posters, and artwork. While digging, I found a historical document that was very personal to me.  I couldn’t help but purchase it for only 25 cents. This poster of the documentary Miss Representation had a handwritten date of 11/18 (2011) on it. Most people would have thought nothing of it and continued to dig around the pile. But I stopped and smiled.

Read more…

Make a Donation to Women of Color Zine Workshops

December 7, 2014

Originally posted on wocpdxzines:

OR give the gift of a donation to the Women of Color Zine Workshops! :) ALL funds will be used to support our projects/activities. Click the “Make a Donation” tab to make a contribution today. Thank you!

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Animal, Vegetable, Mineral: artist Carolyn Sweeney at In Other Words!

December 5, 2014
Did you know, In Other Words Feminist Community Center has rotating art, featuring different local artists, on our gallery wall? It’s true! We have a new art show up right now, so come on by and check it out! 

Carolyn Sweeney’s most recent artistic work will be on display at In Other Words during December and January.  Animal, Vegetable, Mineral consists of wool blankets that Carolyn scavenged and heavily embroidered.  Carolyn uses these blankets to re-imagine classic symbols of the American west, reflecting on ideological conflicts with modern frontier life. Read more…

Discussion About the Real History of Black People in Oregon with Walidah Imarisha

December 3, 2014

Originally posted on wocpdxzines:

Thursday, December 4, 2014

7pm-8:30pm

Friendly House

2617 NW Savier St.

Have you ever wondered why the Black population in Oregon is so small? Oregon has a history not only of Black exclusion and discrimination, but also of a vibrant Black culture that helped sustain many communities throughout the state—a history that is not taught in schools. This is the focus of

“Why Aren’t There More Black People in Oregon? A Hidden History,”

a free conversation with Portland State University author and adjunct professor Walidah Imarisha. This program is hosted by Friendly House and sponsored by Oregon Humanities.

Imarisha has taught in Portland State University’s Black Studies department, where she has created classes about topics as diverse as the history of the Black Panther Party, race and the history of prisons, Hurricane Katrina, and hip hop as literature. She has facilitated writing workshops for students in third to twelfth grade…

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December feminist shopping at In Other Words!

December 3, 2014

Wow, did you know that, in the United States, women-identified adults comprise 85% of all consumer purchases?! Yep, that’s a thing. And that means that consumer purchasing is inherently a feminist issue due to the incredible amount of purchasing power we have in consumerist culture.

So, next time we’re out and about looking for just that perfect gift, let’s remember to always strive to shop ethically, responsibly, and with a feminist mindset that supports local artisans and local shops. And what better way to kick it off than by heading on over to In Other Words Feminist Community CenterRead more…

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